Partners

Københavns Universitet – UCPH (Copenhagen, Denmark) 

 

Gertrud PFISTER

Professor
Department of Sport Sciences

 

 

Dr Gertrud Pfister,  Professor in the Department of Sport Sciences at Københavns Universitet, is an internationally renowned scholar in her field. She has published 15 books and more than 200 peer-reviewed articles in several languages covering various issues of physical activity and sport from historical and sociological perspectives. A main focus of her research is sport and gender: she conducted numerous studies on themes reaching from women’s involvement in sport within various European countries to the development of women’s football and the gendered media coverage of the Olympic Games.

With doctoral degrees in both sociology and history Gertrud is familiar with a wide range of methodological approaches. She has led various international projects, among which comparative studies of women’s football and a cross-cultural comparison of ‘The Meaning of Sport in Women’s Lives’, which included four European countries.

Gertrud  is a former-President of the Inter-national Sociology of Sport Association (ISSA) and of the International Society for the History of Physical Education and Sport (ISHPES). She is also a member of the Scientific Board of the European College of Sport Sciences (ECSS) and the International Association of Sport for Girls and Women (IAPESGW). She serves on the editorial boards of several scientific journals and was invited to more than 50 keynote lectures at various congresses. In 2007, she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate at the Semmelweis University Budapest.

In the FREE project, Gertrud is in charge of the research strand of ‘The Feminisation of Football’ and will organise a thematic conference on this topic in Copenhagen in June 2013.

 

« Participation in the FREE project is an exciting opportunity to gain insight into the strange worlds of football fans. At the same time it will allow me to conduct research about gender differences and similarities among fans and the interest of audiences in women’s football. These are clearly under-researched areas and I am curious about the outcome.

The diversity of knowledge, experiences and tastes among the project members promises heated discussions and I love this !
I am also certain it will increase the quality of the studies and results. »

 

Svenja MINTERT

PhD Researcher
Department of Sport Sciences

 

 

Svenja Mintert studied Sport Sciences at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany and Business Administration at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. Svenja wrote her master thesis on football audiences in the Women's Football Bundesliga in Germany. After graduation, Svenja worked as Program Leader for the Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence in Qatar. Her main fields of research within the FREE project are sociological approaches to women's football and fandom as well as gender and identification processes in a multinational setting.

 

« Football offers a field for research and raises unexplored questions about male vs. female patterns of identification. The FREE project is a great opportunity which provides numerous insights in the world of male and female audiences and fans. »


Københavns Universitet

Copenhagen, Denmark

 

Københavns Universitet, the University of Copenhagen, founded in 1479, is one of the oldest universities in Europe (http://www.ku.dk/). With more than 37 000 students and 100 different institutes, departments, centres, etc., the univer-sity is the largest institution of research and education in Denmark. The Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences is one of the 16 departments of the Faculty of Science and performs top-level research in various disciplines. The five Research Groups at the Department consist in three groups in natural sciences and two groups in human and social sciences including history and sociology. The historians and social scientists explore, among other issues, sport and politics, sport organisations, sport related structures and discourses as well as physical activities and their interrelations with gender, race and social class.
http://www.ku.dk/